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Recommended Interesting Articles

NEWS

Solein, the incredible food made of electricity, water and air

A Finnish company called Solar Foods, which makes a food from electricity, water and air has said it plans to sell 50 million of its products in supermarkets within two years. Solar Foods is also working with the European Space Agency to supply the astronauts on a mission to Mars after devising a method that he says creates a high-protein product that looks and tastes like wheat flour at a cost of 5 euros per kilo.
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VIDEOS

Documentary: Sugar Addiction

Sugar is a disaccharide -sucrose- formed by a molecule of glucose and one of fructose that our body needs, since glucose is the brain's food and provides energy immediately, although its effect lasts for a short time. What is said that high sugar products are empty calories?
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NEWS

Around the world, hundreds of thousands of students go on strike to demand climate action

It is Friday, March 15, and hundreds of thousands of students are expected to leave school to protest the inaction of world leaders on climate change. Young climate activists around the world have been anticipating this day as Christmas without consumerism. Inspired by the newly appointed Nobel Peace Prize nominee Greta Thunberg, Gen-Zers are coming together to send adults a clear message: They must take our future seriously.
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NEWS

Insect apocalypse

A joint study by Chinese and Australian scientists predicts a disaster in 50 years. It's terrible - and not just for insects. Among the many aspects of the planet's devastation, little attention is given to the impending collapse of insect populations. Recent work, by scientists at Australian universities in Sydney and Queensland, and from the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, shows that there should be more concern on the subject.
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TOPICS

Rich countries "should pay the poor" to protect forests

One of the facts of conservation is that the more prosperous a society is, the more likely it is to protect its natural environment. In contrast, less developed nations are prone to exploit and destroy their own in their drive toward greater prosperity. The problem, of course, is that much, if not most, of the world's most biodiverse forests are in developing countries that often cannot afford to protect them from deforestation by loggers, farmers and land developers.
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