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Unmissable talk about electronic waste

Unmissable talk about electronic waste

AdriƔn Turyn is passionate about the operation of electronic devices and from a very young age he had as a hobby to dismantle any machine that appeared to him. In his talk he tells of his passion and shares a concern.

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Global e-waste epidemic

If disposed of improperly, electronic waste can release a variety of toxins, including lead, mercury, and cadmium. However, the US only restricts exports of electronic waste of one type of component, cathode ray tubes. No federal law regulates e-waste recycling, although many US states prohibit dumping of used electronics at landfills and have e-waste recycling programs.

In Hong Kong, Puckett, a Chinese journalist, a translator and a local driver followed a GPS signal to a fence with an identification sign of land for cultivation. Looking to the other side, over the fence, Puckett found workers covered in toner and black inks - a probable carcinogen associated with respiratory problems - escaped by rupturing printers stacked up to 20 feet high in an area as large as a field. soccer. "There is no protection for this workforce ... There are no labor laws that are going to protect them," said Puckett. Shortly before, at another site where workers were dismantling LCD televisions, they encountered workers without protective masks who were unaware of the mercury vapors released when the fluorescent tubes that illuminate the LCD screens break. Even in small amounts, mercury can be a neurotoxin.

Since 182 national governments and the European Union signed the Basel Convention in 1989, an international treaty to stop the dumping of hazardous waste from developed countries into less developed countries, the US is the only industrialized country in the world that has not ratified the treaty. , as EarthFix reported.


Video: E-waste Management Overview (June 2021).