TOPICS

Scientific advice: Air pollutants enter the body directly through the skin

Scientific advice: Air pollutants enter the body directly through the skin

The lungs are responsible for transmitting air pollutants to the body, although a new study published in the medical journal 'Environmental Health Perspectives' has shown that some pollutants (semi-volatile, such as phthalates) can enter the body through the skin. This effect is known as 'dermal absorption' and the amount of absorbed pollutants and toxins can be equivalent to those entering the respiratory tract. Thus, dangerous chemicals enter the bloodstream and can cause a toxic reaction.

Phthalates or esters of phthalic acid are chemicals that increase flexibility in plastics. In high concentrations, these substances could cause asthma and cancer. In an experiment carried out by a team of international scientists, six people participated, who were exposed to high concentrations of chemicals in the air such as diethyl phthalate (DEP) and Di-n-Butyl Phthalate (DNBP). These components can be present in the home, specifically in personal care products (moisturizers, nail polish remover, cleaning products, perfumery, plastic items and other items that we use daily).

Analysis of urine samples from the experiment participants showed that their skin absorption levels were high. We are great sponges for chemicals that are in the environment around us.

The Epoch Times


Video: How harmful air pollution gets to our brains (May 2021).